Making the Best Amateur Cookbook Ever.

Making the Best Amateur Cookbook Ever.

“I think I need more,” she said, with only the slightest trace of sheepish guilt in her expression. “If I give you money, can you see if they have more?”

Tomorrow is my CSA pick-up day.

But today, my coworker, a fellow local food devotee, is hitting me up. She’s shoving money in my hands. For vegetables? Nah. For fruit? Nope. She wants cookbooks . Cookbooks produced by CSA volunteers, no less.

Honestly, I bought one out of obligation. Sight unseen, I plunked down my $20 and expected I’d receive in return some homely little packet of jumbled text.

I expected an amateur effort that I’d push into my bookshelf and never, ever reach for (except to drag it from living space to living space throughout the course of my life). That’s how these things work.

But lo! The cover was actually pretty nice. The pages were attractive. The photography was certifiably gorgeous. The interstitial artwork was tasteful. The recipes looked genuinely tasty . Indeed, it appeared this might be the first amateur cookbook I’d put into regular use in my kitchen.

My coworker saw it the next day and immediately wanted one. So at the next week’s pick-up, I bought one for her and an extra copy for myself.

This week, I’m going back for more . I’m buying these cookbooks not out of some idea about nurturing the community, but out of a need for more of these great cookbooks that I can give as gifts.

Keep in mind, this was a very small-run book. You probably won’t ever actually see one. (You can cook my two contributions — Summer Succotash and Divine Brine for Ramps, Scallions or Onions — from the recipes here.) But you may someday be involved in creating a community cookbook yourself. After all, thousands of these things are published on small press runs every year.

If and when that happens, you might be interested in doing what the Williamsburg-Greenpoint CSA is doing, because clearly, they’re getting a few things right.

How To Make An Amazing Community Cookbook (Lessons from the GWCSA Cookbook)

  1. Know the Readers. (CSA members, in this case.)
    The folks who put this book together were very selective about which recipes would be most useful to their audience. They didn’t use every recipe that came to the desk. And I think they chose well. A recipe like Zucchini & Caramelized Kohlrabi Quesadillas might not be right for every cookbook, but that page is bound to be a great relief to someone faced with a bunch of kohlrabi and no ideas. (That’ll be me next month.)

  2. Keep it Focused.
    The Well Seasoned cookbook has a real sense of place. In addition to recipes from GWCSA members, the editors include recipes from beloved local restaurants. I’m looking forward to cooking Enid’s Sweet & Hot Collard Greens and making Taco Chulo’s Escabeche this summer.

  3. Include relevant extras.
    The front of the book begins with a guide to identifying and cooking all the major CSA vegetables we see throughout the season. The back of the book features a conversion guide, cooking terms, cook’s notes and a nicely organized index. There are sidebars on Home Composting, Cooking for Pets and Preserving Summer’s Bounty (canning, pickling and drying).

  4. Use gorgeous photography.
    I know full-color pages are more expensive, but so many small-run cookbooks neglect the mouthwatering beauty that color photographs provide, and that’s a shame. Nothing inspires and motivates a cookbook reader like visions of tastiness dancing in the head.

  5. Pay attention to detail.
    The book printed on recycled, chlorine-free paper using wind power (see point #1). Each recipe includes servings/yield and the approximate preparation time. Vegan recipes are noted with a symbol beside the recipe name. All the food photography notes the recipe name and its page number. The book is spiral-bound to make it easy to use in the kitchen. There’s a consistent recipe style used throughout. Attention to this kind of minutia might seem fussy, but it’s essential when you actually want to prepare the recipes, as opposed to using the piece as a coffee table book.

The truth of the matter is this: my CSA, the GWCSA, is populated by very talented professionals.

This amateur cookbook isn’t strictly amateur. I note that the editor of this volume has years of experience in publishing, the art director/illustrator works for Saveur and the lead photographer seems to know her way around a food shot.

That said, I think anyone doing their own small-run cookbook can heed five simple hints from the pros (know the reader, keep it focused, provide extras, use color photography, mind the details) and polish a rough-hewn booklet into a useful and appealing little gem that’ll keep people (like my swooning coworker) coming back for more.

Happy Eating!
Miss Ginsu

You might also be interested in...

Add your email for monthly food tips and inspiration

* indicates required
comments powered by Disqus