On Brooklyn Home Brewing and Hopping with Anticipation
On Brooklyn Home Brewing and Hopping with Anticipation

Remember the anticipation of childhood? The upcoming birthday. Christmas morning. Summer camp. Children are capable of an eagerness so passionate, you can almost watch them vibrate when they ponder certain approaching moments. Of course, we soon learn that the anticipation is often strangely sweeter than the ultimate gratification. But I must admit, I’m feeling some great, giddy excitement since visiting the Brooklyn Flea recently and picking up one of Brooklyn Brew Shop’s dandy little homebrew beer kits.

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Travel Recipes The Delights of Duluth & Quadberry Crumble Pie

The Big View Ah, Duluth… So much easier to say than, say Keegewaquampe (though in truth, the Chippewa kind of had first dibs on naming rights). Mum and I met up in Minneapolis and pushed north to take in the promised delights of the Lake Superior region. And delight there was. We were only there overnight, so I won’t be revealing any state secrets here, but I will say that if only famed Kentucky Representative J.

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Recipes Recession Proof: Rumsford’s Soup

If you read much food writing, you may have encountered writer MFK Fisher’s notes on thrifty cuisine. In her 1942 recession-proof tome, How to Cook a Wolf she wrote of an inexpensive, nutritious meat-grain subsistence loaf (writer Jeffrey Steingarten later taste-tested that very recipe in The Man Who Ate Everything). But far earlier than that, in the late 1700s, a remarkably multi-talented scientist/inventor named [Benjamin Thompson](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Thompson “Wikipedia”) (later known as Count von Rumford) was also interested in nutritious subsistence food, which led him to the creation of Rumford Soup.

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Drinking Like a Viking: How to Make a Mead
Recipes How to Drinking Like a Viking: How to Make a Mead

Apparently, it’s the American Homebrewer’s Association Mead Day. And as it’s sweltering summertime out there, I can’t think of a better day to highlight the pleasures of DIY beverages, not to mention the plight of agricultural honeybees. Though oft dismissed as the stuff of Ren Fairs and the creative anachronism crowd, mead is actually not that difficult to do at home. And (bonus!) being a generous homebrewer is guaranteed to make you immediately popular in your neighborhood and totally valuable after the apocalypse.

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A Sweltering Summer Secret: Mi Chelada Es Su Chelada
Recipes A Sweltering Summer Secret: Mi Chelada Es Su Chelada

Nearly 10 years ago, I visited the Yucatán Peninsula for the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) festival and discovered a wonderful, refreshing drink they called the michelada. It was a zippy cold cocktail of sour, savory and salty and umami flavors with brisk carbonation… just the thing for an afternoon of snorkeling, sunbathing and snacking on fresh fish tacos beside the sea. I didn’t see another michelada until I moved to NYC and finally rediscovered them at Barrio Chino, where the staff poured micheladas just the way I remembered, not to mention making great Yucatán-style fish tacos.

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Food Quote Friday: MFK Fisher

“I don’t think we eat enough soup here in the States. It can, and often should, be a meal in itself, as an occasional good book devoted to the subject tries to prove. What is better, more resting on a Sunday night than a tureen of steaming, buttery oyster stew, plenty of little round crackers and some cold white wine or lager beer?” — MFK Fisher

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Bottle and brew for the bird (and you)

If you’re reading this in the US, you’re very likely celebrating Thanksgiving with a turkey. If you’ve heard this tune before, you may have noticed by now that the turkey can be a tricky dance partner. When the breast meat is done, the legs are overcooked. When the legs are perfect, the breast is raw.* A whole turkey takes up most of the oven for most of the day, leaving little room for side dishes or desserts.

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Beer. Garden. Sausage. What more could you want?

For the few New Yorkers not heading out of the city for the weekend, the City conspires to treat you to its richest display of hospitality. Stinky piles of garbage? Gone. Stuffy, crowded subways? Fuggetaboutit. Stifling heat and humidity wafting up from the asphalt? A fuzzy memory. The weather promises unparalleled beauty, the streets will be uncharacteristically quiet, parks and restaurants will be joyfully unpopulated and Czech beer will flow in a big backyard in Queens.

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About Me

Miss Ginsu is a nom-nom-nom de plume of Leitha Matz, who worked at Tabla and FreshDirect in NYC, wrote about the food scene from 2004 to 2009 in Brooklyn and presently lives in Berlin. Occasionally seen on TV cooking segments, Leitha has also written for FreshDirect, contributed to Cee Cee Berlin, The Food52 Cookbook and has been interviewed/quoted in The Food Keeper as well as The Washington Times and Salon.

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