Recycled Bird (or Squirrel) Feeder
Recycled Bird (or Squirrel) Feeder

Correct me if I’m wrong, because I don’t buy a lot of juice, but I believe this image is showing off a clever way to reuse an old plastic juice container. Visiting in Minneapolis last weekend, mom and I stopped in at a roadside rest stop and found this little household recycling project swinging from the trees. (And come to think of it, that actually looks like an onion bag filled with suet in the background.

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Recipes Recession-Proof Espresso: Be Your Own Barista

I must say, I’m a little torn these days between supporting my local coffee shop and saving some money by making my own espresso drinks. They need the money. I need the money. I’ll probably just split the difference. I love the community that local, independent coffee shops provide, but having worked as a barista in college, I also know that the process of creating coffee drinks is easy (and yes!

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Recipes How I Fell in Love with Brussels Sprouts

I grew up with Brussels Sprouts prejudice. My dad didn’t like ‘em. He’d only ever known the sprightly sprout under poor conditions — namely, my grandmother’s vicious habit of boiling veggies into submission. They were bitter and mushy at the same time. Wretched pale lumps. I didn’t blame him for loathing them, and with his opinionated introduction, I never even considered experimenting with sprouts. Later on, (much later, to my great dismay these days) I discovered the Brussels Sprout the way it was meant to be: roasted.

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Chicken Soup 5 Ways

Through an error in calculation, I robbed ya’ll of a soup post last week. Mea culpa. I make good today. So we’re aware there’s more than one way to pluck a chicken… or make a chicken soup, for that matter. In addition to making a supremely simple homemade chicken soup from a rotisserie bird, I’m offering up five inspirations from points across the globe on ways to make that satisfying bowl of chicken-soup comfort entirely different.

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Recipes Recession Proof: Rumsford’s Soup

If you read much food writing, you may have encountered writer MFK Fisher’s notes on thrifty cuisine. In her 1942 recession-proof tome, How to Cook a Wolf she wrote of an inexpensive, nutritious meat-grain subsistence loaf (writer Jeffrey Steingarten later taste-tested that very recipe in The Man Who Ate Everything). But far earlier than that, in the late 1700s, a remarkably multi-talented scientist/inventor named [Benjamin Thompson](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Thompson “Wikipedia”) (later known as Count von Rumford) was also interested in nutritious subsistence food, which led him to the creation of Rumford Soup.

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Top Ten Tips for Recession-Proof Recipes

The Cooking for the Recession topic recently came up at NPR’s Planet Money blog, so I was compelled to comment, having written on the topic for nearly a year now. As I typed it out, I realized I should probably do a similar top-ten roundup. Top Ten Tips for Recession-Proof Recipes Roasting makes just about anything taste rich and decadent. Full of vitamins, protein, fiber and flavor, beans are your new best friends.

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Resolution #1: Better Brown Bagging

Get to (or stay at) a healthy weight. Enjoy variety. Save money. Control what goes into your body. Feel more organized. These are just a few of the many tasty benefits wrapped up in the resolution to pack more delicious lunches to take to work. Truth is, I’ve known all the terrific reasons to pack lunch for quite some time, but I’ve never quite been able to put the plan in action.

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Recipes Day 23: Christmas Gumbo

*This post marks Day 23 of Miss Ginsu’s 2008 Advent Calendar. In my neighborhood, ‘tis the season of the big carp slaughter. Apparently it’s traditional for Polish folks to eat fresh carp for Christmas (part of the traditional “fish on holy days” tradition, no doubt) so the fishes are currently swimming about in cold-water pools waiting to be chopped up for dinners across the ‘hood. Likewise, in Italy, southern folks celebrate the feast of the seven fishes over the holidays.

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Recipes Day 14: Lemon-Ginger Bath Cookies

*This post marks Day 14 of Miss Ginsu’s 2008 Advent Calendar . There are those gelid winter days on which some part of me believes I’ll never be warm again. These are the moments when I pine for a wood-scented sauna, but settle for a hot, spiced bath instead. J’s mom makes awesome soaps, but anything having to do with lye is a bit terrifying to me. I also love fizzy bath bombs notmartha has a great post on that… I just haven’t been able to lay hands on liquid glycerin and spherical molds yet.

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Smoked Chops & Apple-Kissed Kraut

I had grand plans for a gorgeous autumnal Choucroute Garni, but life interfered (I’m certain you’re well aware of know how life tends to do that) and I realized that a long-cooking dish in the Dutch oven simply wouldn’t do. Food needed to appear on the table STAT. Luckily, a deconstructed Choucroute Garni happens to make for one of the quickest meals out there. And a darn tasty one at that.

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About Me

Miss Ginsu is a nom-nom-nom de plume of Leitha Matz, who worked at Tabla and FreshDirect in NYC, wrote about the food scene from 2004 to 2009 in Brooklyn and presently lives in Berlin. Occasionally seen on TV cooking segments, Leitha has also written for FreshDirect, contributed to Cee Cee Berlin, The Food52 Cookbook and has been interviewed/quoted in The Food Keeper as well as The Washington Times and Salon.

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