Chicken Soup 5 Ways

Through an error in calculation, I robbed ya’ll of a soup post last week. Mea culpa. I make good today. So we’re aware there’s more than one way to pluck a chicken… or make a chicken soup, for that matter. In addition to making a supremely simple homemade chicken soup from a rotisserie bird, I’m offering up five inspirations from points across the globe on ways to make that satisfying bowl of chicken-soup comfort entirely different.

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Recipes Recession-Proof Recipes: Savory Green Curry

In a time of high food costs, people often look to cheaper proteins, but I think turkey is often overlooked because of its association with winter holiday meals. Turkey is a flavorful, inexpensive meat, and if you get a small bird (some stores even sell half-birds or breast roasts), you don’t have to spend all day cooking it. Just wash it, dry it, give it a quick massage with some oil, salt and pepper, set the oven to 375°F, put the bird (or half-bird, or whatever) in a roasting pan, set the timer for 15 minutes per pound of meat and go find something else to do for a while.

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Recipes Sopa de Gallo: A (Much Tastier) Chicken in Every Pot

Though Herbert Hoover is often (and falsely) credited with a campaign promise to give the nation “a chicken in every pot,” the phrase never sounded terribly enticing to me. Chicken was usually pretty disappointing in the flavor department. Truthfully, when I was growing up, there wasn’t much chicken around the house. After we moved off the farm, Dad thought the grocery store chickens lacked the appropriate oomph, so we ate lots more turkey than chicken.

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Recipes Recession-Proof Recipes: A More Manageable Molé

The skinless, boneless chicken breast may be the monarch of the meat world these days, but thighs hold so much more flavor and are at least half the price of breasts. Plus, legs and thighs are terrific stewed. Cook ‘em long (braising or stewing is as good as roasting for making the most of cheaper cuts) season ‘em well and serve ‘em up over rice or noodles for some super-thrifty bulk.

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Recipes A Million Methods for Moroccan Stew

My first Moroccan Stew recipe, out of Sundays at Moosewood Restaurant , was essentially a tomato-rich vegetable stew with a handful of black olives and a squeeze of lemon. It was full of potato cubes, artichoke hearts and green beans, with no real spice to speak of. Later on, I discovered that lamb was a fairly traditional component of Moroccan Stew, though lots of cooks used chicken. Cinnamon, apricots and cured olives seemed to be common ingredients.

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Day 2: Soup for a Rainy (or Snowy) Day

*This post marks Day 2 of Miss Ginsu’s 2007 Advent Calendar. Chicken soup is now scientifically proven to alleviate symptoms of the common cold (and even if it wasn’t… it’s so warm and soothing we probably shouldn’t care about the scientific studies that much anyway). I think it makes sense to keep a few pints of it in the freezer. Why? Well, what if you should happen to catch a cold?

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About Me

Miss Ginsu is a nom-nom-nom de plume of Leitha Matz, who worked at Tabla and FreshDirect in NYC, wrote about the food scene from 2004 to 2009 in Brooklyn and presently lives in Berlin. Occasionally seen on TV cooking segments, Leitha has also written for FreshDirect, contributed to Cee Cee Berlin, The Food52 Cookbook and has been interviewed/quoted in The Food Keeper as well as The Washington Times and Salon.

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