Picnic-Ready Mustard Eggs: Cooking With the Devil
Recipes How to Picnic-Ready Mustard Eggs: Cooking With the Devil

I like to take deviled eggs to picnics. They’re delicious, impressive and actually easier to transport and assemble than you’d think. Read on, and I’ll show you how to do it. But first, I have a story that goes along with my deviled eggs and that’s about one of my more embarassing moments… On a Pennsylvania-based business trip for work, I met and interviewed an Amish family. We were hoping to bring their free-range eggs into our business, so we got a tour of the facilities before being invited to sit down for lunch in their home.

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On Egg Labels and Grocery Store Tourism
Travel On Egg Labels and Grocery Store Tourism

An adorable goat’s milk yogurt label from Trento, Italy This may seem a bit strange, but one of my very favorite overseas travel activities isn’t visiting the museums or galleries (though they’re very nice, of course)… it’s touring the local groceries, markets and drug stores. I like to see how the average person lives. In Italy, for example, your average shopper has access to powerful traceability and sourcing information. The eggshells come with printed sets of numbers.

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Recipes A Dozen Ideas for Boiled Eggs

Ahh, Easter. Egg dying. Egg hiding. Egg finding. And then… a lot of hard-boiled eggs to use up in a hurry. I’m sure you know how to make a simple egg salad (dice boiled eggs, add chopped celery if you like and slather with enough mayo to moisten), but just in case you’re long on eggs and short on ideas, here’s a dozen other things to do with a hard-boiled egg.

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Day 22: Eggnog Flan

*This post marks Day 22 of Miss Ginsu’s 2008 Advent Calendar. After falling in love with the divine flan at a local taco place, I thought it’d be a good idea to combine a lifelong passion for eggnog with the decadent flan genre. In case you’ve never made flan, it’s kind of a two-step process. The first step involves making a caramel sauce that coats the bottom of the pan. Thereafter, a custard mixture is poured over the caramel and it’s baked, then flipped over to put the caramel at the top, making the process very like a tarte tatin or a pineapple upside-down cake.

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Food Quote Friday: Gary Fincke

“Whatever the Sunday, the sorrows kept the women in the kitchen, My cousins and their mothers, my grandmother, her sister, all of them Foraging through the nerves for pain. They sighed and rustled and one would Name her sorrows to cue sympathy’s murmurs, the first offerings Of possible cures: three eggs for chills and fever, the benefits Of mint and pepper, boneset, sage, and crocus tea.” — Gary Fincke from “The Sorrows”

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Recession-Proof Recipes: La Crepe Complete
Recipes Recession-Proof Recipes: La Crepe Complete

Last week’s Recession-Proof Recipe examined stock and gave a fast variation for Pho. Pho is some of my favorite simple peasant food, and this week, I’d like to take an economical eating cue from yet another group of peasants. Like yesterday’s cassoulet, a humble country casserole that’s often elevated beyond its original station, the sometimes pretentiously presented French crêpe is essentially just a thin pancake with tasty tidbits rolled up inside it.

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Food Quote Friday: Charles H. Baker, Jr

“Words to the Wise No. VII. Offering up an earnest plea for recentness in all eggs to be used in cocktails or drinks of any kind, for that matter. A stale or storage egg in a decent mixed drink is like a stale or storage joke in critical and intelligent company. Eschew them rabidly. If really fresh eggs can’t be had, mix other type drinks, for the result will reflect no merit round the hearth, no matter how hospitable it may be.

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Food Quote Friday: J. B. Priestly

“We plan, we toil, we suffer — in the hope of what? A camel-load of idol’s eyes? The title deeds of Radio City? The empire of Asia? A trip to the moon? No, no, no, no. Simply to wake just in time to smell coffee and bacon and eggs.” J. B. Priestly (1894-1984)

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About Me

Miss Ginsu is a nom-nom-nom de plume of Leitha Matz, who worked at Tabla and FreshDirect in NYC, wrote about the food scene from 2004 to 2009 in Brooklyn and presently lives in Berlin. Occasionally seen on TV cooking segments, Leitha has also written for FreshDirect, contributed to Cee Cee Berlin, The Food52 Cookbook and has been interviewed/quoted in The Food Keeper as well as The Washington Times and Salon.

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